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PROTECTING TURTLES IN FIJI

The Great Sea Reef is the third longest barrier reef in the world, running the entire length of Vanua Levu's (Fiji's second largest island's) north coast. WWF has been working with Great Sea Reef communities for over 8 years, supporting the establishment of marine and terrestrial protected areas and making sure they're effectively taken care of by local communities.

Fiji Turtles

To date, at least 11 Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have been successfully established and implemented with anecdotal results already indicating increases in fish catches outside the MPAs and increased income for coastal dwellers.

An important part of WWF's work in the Great Sea Reef is conserving Fiji's turtle populations. The past twenty years has seen numbers decimated in the Coral Triangle and Pacific Islands Region. One of the main threats has been over harvesting - WWF has been working with communities in Fiji to educate them on the importance of conserving turtles and have set up monitoring and conservation programmes with villagers in 10 coastal areas.


The communities help by gathering information via nesting beach surveys and satellite tracking of the turtle populations which help build a clearer picture of turtle behaviours during the nesting season, as well as their feeding habits among coral beds in Great Sea Reef. Through turtle conservation projects broader environmental challenges such as coastal erosion, marine pollution and coral reef degradation are also being tackled. 

We're delighted that our Forever Fish campaign is helping to fund this important programme.